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Parallelism

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8 May 2015



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Parallelism

Scaling a data platform is more than just storage engines though. We need to consider parallelism.

When distributing data over many machines we have two core primitives to play with: partitioning and replication. Partitioning, sometimes called sharding, works well both for random access and brute force workloads.

If a hash-based partitioning model is used the data will be spread across a number of machines using a well-known hash function. This is similar to the way a hash table works, with each bucket being held on a different machine.

The result is that any value can be read by going directly to the machine that contains the data, via the hash function. This pattern is wonderfully scalable and is the only pattern that shows linear scalability as the number of client requests increases. Requests are isolated to a single machine. Each one will be served by just a single machine in the cluster.

We can also use partitioning to provide parallelism over batch computations, for example aggregate functions or more complex algorithms such as those we might use for clustering or machine learning. The key difference is that we exercise all machines at the same time, in a broadcast manner. This allows us to solve a large computational problem in a much shorter time, using a divide and conquer approach.

Batch systems work well for large problems, but provide little concurrency as they tend to exhaust the resources on the cluster when they execute.

So the two extremes are pretty simple: directed access at one end, broadcast, divide and conquer at the other. Where we need to be careful is in the middle ground that lies between the two. A good example of this is the use of secondary indexes in NoSQL stores that span many machines.

A secondary index is an index that isn’t on the primary key. This means the data will not be partitioned by the values in the index. Directed routing via a hash function is no longer an option. We have to broadcast requests to all machines. This limits concurrency. Every node must be involved in every query.

For this reason many key value stores have resisted the temptation to add secondary indexes, despite their obvious use. HBase and Voldemort are examples of this. But many others do expose them, MongoDB, Cassandra, Riak etc. This is good as secondary indexes are useful. But it’s important to understand the effect they will have on the overall concurrency of the system.

The route out of this concurrency bottleneck is replication. You’ll probably be familiar with replication either from using async slave databases or from replicated NoSQL stores like Mongo or Cassandra.

In practice replicas can be invisible (used only for recovery), read only (adding read concurrency) or read write (adding partition tolerance). Which of these you choose will trade off against the consistency of the system. This is simply the application of CAP theorem (although cap theorem also may not be as simple as you think).

This tradeoff with consistency* brings us to an important question. When does consistency matter?

Consistency is expensive. In the database world ACID is guaranteed by serialisability. This is essentially ensuring that all operations appear to occur in sequential order.  It turns out to be a pretty expensive thing. In fact it’s prohibitive enough that many databases don’t offer it as an isolation level at all. Those that do never set it as the default.

Suffice to say that if you apply strong consistency to a system that does distributed writes you’ll likely end up in tortoise territory.

(* note the term consistency has two common usages. The C in ACID and the C in CAP. They are unfortunately not the same. I’m using the CAP definition: all nodes see the same data at the same time)

The solution to this consistency problem is simple. Avoid it. If you can’t avoid it isolate it to as few writers and as few machines as possible.

Avoiding consistency issues is often quite easy, particularly if your data is an immutable stream of facts. A set of web logs is a good example. They have no consistency concerns as they are just facts that never change.

There are other use cases which do necessitate consistency though. Transferring money between accounts is an oft used example. Non-commutative actions such as applying discount codes is another.

But often things that appear to need consistency, in a traditional sense, may not. For example if an action can be changed from a mutation to a new set of associated facts we can avoid mutable state. Consider marking a transaction as being potentially fraudulent. We could update it directly with the new field. Alternatively we could simply use a separate stream of facts that links back to the original transaction.

So in a data platform it’s useful to either remove the consistency requirement altogether, or at least isolate it. One way to isolate is to use the single writer principal, this gets you some of the way. Datomic is a good example of this. Another is to physically isolate the consistency requirement by splitting mutable and immutable worlds.

Approaches like Bloom/CALM extend this idea further by embracing the concept of disorder by default, imposing order only when necessary.

So those were some of the fundamental tradeoffs we need to consider. Now how to we pull these things together to build a data platform?

A typical application architecture might look something like the below. We have a set of processes which write data to a database and read it back again. This is fine for many simple workloads. Many successful applications have been built with this pattern. But we know it works less well as throughput grows. In the application space this is a problem we might tackle with message-passing, actors, load balancing etc.

The other problem is this approach treats the database as a black box. Databases are clever software. They provide a huge wealth of features. But they provide little mechanism for scaling out of an ACID world. This is a good thing in many ways. We default to safety. But it can become an annoyance when scaling is inhibited by general guarantees which may be overkill for the requirements we have.

The simplest route out of this is CQRS (Command Query Responsibility Segregation).

Another very simple idea. We separate read and write workloads. Writes go into something write-optimised. Something closer to a simple journal file. Reads come from something read-optimised. There are many ways to do this, be it tools like Goldengate for relational technologies or products that integrate replication internally such as Replica Sets in MongoDB.

Many databases do something like this under the hood. Druid is a nice example. Druid is an open source, distributed, time-series, columnar analytics engine. Columnar storage works best if we input data in large blocks, as the data must be spread across many files. To get good write performance Druid stores recent data in a write optimised store. This is gradually ported over to the read optimised store over time.

When Druid is queried the query routes to both the write optimised and read optimised components. The results are combined (‘reduced’) and returned to the user. Druid uses time, marked on each record, to determine ordering.

Composite approaches like this provide the benefits of CQRS behind a single abstraction.

Another similar approach is to use an Operational/Analytic Bridge. Read- and write-optimised views are separated using an event stream. The stream of state is retained indefinitely, so that the async views can be recomposed and augmented at a later date by replaying.

So the front section provides for synchronous reads and writes. This can be as simple as immediately reading data that was written or as complex as supporting ACID transactions.

The back end leverages asynchronicity, and the advantages of immutable state, to scale offline processing through replication, denormalisation or even completely different storage engines. The messaging-bridge, along with joining the two, allows applications to listen to the data flowing through the platform.

As a pattern this is well suited to mid-sized deployments where there is at least a partial, unavoidable requirement for a mutable view.


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