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Teaching creative computer science

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12 October 2015


Teaching creative computer science

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Simon Peyton Jones wants children not just to consume technology, but to be creative with it. What does that mean for teaching computer science in schools, and why is the rest of the world watching England?

Simon Peyton Jones is a principal researcher at Microsoft Research in Cambridge. His research focus is in programming language design and implementation, and the purely-functional language Haskell in particular. He is a founder member and current chair of the Computing at School working group, which has played a central role in the recent reform of the school Computing curriculum.

At TEDxExeter 2014 our speakers and performers connected us with other worlds. Our talks exposed corruption in big business, shared effective approaches to tackling social inequality and gave a voice to those whose human rights are under threat. We explored the impact of fast changing technologies on all our lives. We journeyed through fire and forest to frozen landscapes. We were challenged to consider worlds of extremes, cutting edge controversies and risky opportunities. https://twitter.com/simonpj0

Video Production Chromatrope (http://chromatrope.co.uk/) Production Manager Andy Robertson (http://www.youtube.com/familygamertv)

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)


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